SELF-DIRECTED SUPPORT

Helping You To Take Control.

SACMHA Is Here To Help You Take Control

We offer a range of service options under our Self-Directed Support.  Find out more below.

To arrange to discuss your options, please contact Sonya Chattoo at s.chattoo@sacmha.org.uk.

What Is Self-Directed Support?

Self-Directed Support (SDS) is when:

  • You are in control of the money you get for your support
  • You can choose how to spend the money for your support
  • You can choose things about your life – for example, who you want to get support from

You can get help to do these things if you need it.

Who Can You Ask About Self-Directed Support

You can ask:
  • A care manager or social worker
  • Other people at the council who know about Self-Directed Support
  • People who support you now
  • Your friends or family
  • Someone who already has a Personal Budget
  • People who work for SACMHA

Take Control Today

If you would like to know more about taking control of your support, contact SACMHA and speak to a member of staff, who will discuss and explain this in detail with you.

7 Steps To Being In Control

  1. Find out how much money you can get to spend on support.
  2. Make a plan, the plan will say how you will spend the money.
  3. Get your plan agreed. A care manager or social worker will have to agree the plan before you can get the money.
  4. Organise your money. When your plan is agreed and you get your money. You can have it yourself in a direct payment OR you can choose someone to look after the money for you.
  5. Organise your support. This is when you sort out the support you want and who will help you with this.
  6. Living life. This is about living your life in a way that is meaningful to you.
  7. Seeing how it worked. Your care manager or social worker will meet with you to see how your plan is. working and how you are spending your money. The mental capacity Act says some people must have an Attorney or Deputy to make decisions about money, health and support. This is for people who can’t decide things themselves – who ‘lack capacity’.